Daniel Cohen: Applying Swarm Engineering to Control Collective Cell Dynamics

Mon, Dec 10, 2018, 12:00 pm

Multicellular life is driven by collective cell migration spanning morphogenesis, growth, wound healing, and even cancer invasion.  Our group seeks to better understand such collective behaviors in living tissues in order that we can learn to control them, much as a shepherd and sheepdog herd sheep. Drawing on biophysics, swarm theory, cell biology, and engineering, we are developing new tools to manipulate collective cell dynamics. Here, we will explore two such approaches—'Outside-In’ and ‘Inside-Out’ control. In the former case, we steer epithelial tissue collective migration and growth in real-time during using programmable electric fields (electrotaxis). Crucially, global commands (e.g. ‘Move Left’) are locally interpreted by subdomains of cells within the larger tissue, making precise, complex control feasible. We are working to refine both the instrumentation and our understanding of what electrotaxis can, and cannot do, with regards to controlling or ‘sculpting’ complex tissues. In parallel, we have developed an ‘Inside-Out’ swarm control approach based on introducing ‘cellular mimics’--3D microstructures mimicking the geometry and cadherin presentation of native cell-cell junctions—to tissues in order to recapitulate cell-cell recognition and adhesion between a living tissue and a cellular mimic. By linking into the endogenous coupling network (cell-cell adhesion), these cellular mimics are allowing us to manipulate and program collective cell behaviors from within a tissue. Together, our swarm control approaches offer new tools to interactively control the behavior of living tissues.

Location: 
Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall
Speaker(s): 

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In vivo, the human genome folds into a characteristic ensemble of 3D structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown.

Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

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Loren Frank, University of California at San Francisco...

Location: The Graduate Center - Science Center, Room 4102 - 365 Fifth Avenue, between 34th and 35th Streets, in Manhattan

Benny Chain: TBD

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Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

Elizabeth Hillman: TBD

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Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

Massimo Vergassola: Waves and flows in the early embryogenesis of Drosophila melanogaster

Mon, Apr 8, 2019, 12:00 pm

Early embryogenesis of most metazoans is characterized by rapid and synchronous cleavage divisions.

Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

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A bottom-up approach to microbial community assembly
Jeff Gore, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Location: The Graduate Center - Skylight Room, 9100 - 365 Fifth Avenue, between 34th and 35th Streets, in Manhattan

Markus Meister: TBD

Mon, Apr 15, 2019, 12:00 pm

 

 

Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

Madhav Mani: TBD

Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 12:00 pm
Location: Joseph Henry Room Jadwin Hall

Dynamics and information in transcriptional control

Fri, May 3, 2019, 9:30 am to 6:00 pm

Transcription factors, chromosome topology, and transcription control
Jie Xiao, Johns Hopkins University

Location: The Graduate Center - Science Center, Room 4102 - 365 Fifth Avenue, between 34th and 35th Streets, in Manhattan